Overcoming impostor syndrome | The Rosie Report

  • Experts Feels like they need to know everything they could possibly know about a project or skill before they can start doing it. Often they look for ways to continue learning about the skill or project (like certifications, training, or books) to the point that they research their entire lives without ever trying it. They feel like they must meet every single qualification for a job description before they can apply for it and they shouldn’t bother applying if they don’t have all of them.
  • Struggle The “ natural genius “ has to struggle, work hard, or feel discomfort to accomplish something and it makes them think they are not good enough. They use it as proof that they are an imposter.
  • Superhuman They push themselves to work harder than anyone around them to prove that they’re not imposters. They need to succeed on a high level in every aspect of life (work, family, relationships, at the gym) and feel stressed when they are not accomplished on a high level.
  • your grades were never good enough
  • your tuning or rhythm was never quite right
  • your writing was always heavily critiqued
  • your sibling outshone you.
  • Reframe Observe the feelings of Imposter Syndrome and put them in perspective. Try not to engage the thought. Ask, “Does this thought help or hinder me?” “Is this thought true?” “Is there a way to get around it?” Often the easiest way to get over feelings of being an imposter is by taking action. I know, that’s SO SCARY but it truly is the best way that I’ve found. Don’t get me wrong, 80% of the time I’m too afraid to do this. But when I do, I feel phenomenal and competent and I hope to get that down to 30%. If you’re not ready for this, try one of the exercises below. They’re a softer introduction to overcoming your thoughts.
  • Give yourself credit: Write down a list of things you’re good at, things you’ve accomplished, things that make you unique, things that you love to do, things that argue your feelings of being an imposter. Don’t feel like you have to be the best to write something down! If you can’t think of anything, ask someone you know! My roommate made me feel so seen and valid when I asked her, and she told me things I never would’ve given myself credit for.
  • Talk to yourself: I know this sounds awkward and uncomfortable and silly. Trust me, though, it works. Just try it. Tell yourself the things you want to hear. Look yourself in the eye. Say them with confidence. Here are some of my favorites.
  • Talk to someone else: Talking to a coach, therapist, peers who are experiencing the same thing, and even my friends who are not has helped immensely. It also helped me learn that people in other industries (aside from music and freelance writing) experience this too. I’ve met computer programmers, photographers, and even corporate businesspeople who struggle with this! For me, knowing that I’m not alone and that it is possible to overcome these feelings.

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